DFK International has been ranked as the 6th largest association in the world in the International Accounting Bulletin’s (IAB’s) annual 2022 World Survey Report.

Crowleys DFK has been a proud member of DFK International for twenty-nine years.

The report is based on collective fee income, with DFK International members firms achieving a turnover of $1.532 billion.

DFK has sat in seventh place for 10 years but has moved up the list after achieving a growth rate of 3% compared to the previous year.

The association now has 230 member firms, 1,413 partners, 13,919 staff members and 455 offices in 94 countries.

Martin Sharp, executive director of DFK International, said:

“We are very proud to be among the leading associations worldwide.

Moving up to sixth place demonstrates that despite the pandemic, DFK remains one of the strongest associations in the world and our member firms have continued to grow, which is a fantastic achievement.

We have seen growth across all services lines, particularly in North America, which shows that our members have continued to provide outstanding support to their clients in a challenging environment and in-turn have expanded their practices.

We now look forward to another successful year as we continue to do business and share knowledge and best practice to achieve further growth.”

Being a part of an association with a strong global presence has greatly widened Crowleys DFK’s intellectual resources, allowing us to offer local advice supported by a broader knowledge of international financial reporting.

This breadth of knowledge is a critical resource for our clients, which include leading firms in industries such as information and communications technology, e-commerce, life sciences, manufacturing and consumer products.

These clients find that our expert team provides fundamental advice on structuring their Irish operations, on securing Government funding, and dealing with tax and legal obligations.

As Ireland continues to be a vital hub for international business, our understanding of the challenges faced by companies moving into Ireland will continue to be a critical resource.

Eddie Murphy, Head of Tax and FDI Services at Crowleys DFK, said:

“At Crowleys DFK, we understand the challenges faced by our SME and owner-managed business clients. We are proud of the reputation and long-term relationships we have built with them over the years.

Whether it’s getting advice on taking on two employees in Germany, accessing capital markets in London or New York or helping technology companies expand into San Francisco, we connect our clients with trusted professionals throughout the world.

In many cases our clients prefer to deal with us and in these instances, we instruct the other DFK firms. This means clients can concentrate on their business and don’t need to spend time developing new relationships abroad.”

To learn more about DFK International visit www.dfk.com.

DFK's 60th Anniversary

Crowleys DFK is celebrating global independent accountancy association DFK’s 60th anniversary. We are proud to have been members for the past 29 years.

Reflecting on the 60th milestone, Martin Sharp, executive director of DFK International, said:

“In 1962 the founders of DFK International envisaged setting up an association of independent firms that could support their clients to do business internationally and provide an alternative to the big networks which were being set-up.

Although DFK has grown considerably and the international business landscape has changed, the principles and ethos on which DFK was established still remain.

Beyond this, DFK provides a forum to share knowledge and best practice between like-minded individuals who are keen to support their clients and help fellow member firms.

We have a strong family atmosphere which has grown over the years to give member firms the opportunity to build relationships with people from different countries and different cultures.

This year we celebrate this success and look forward to continuing to build these relationships in the years to come.”

James O’Connor, Managing Partner at Crowleys DFK commented:

“There is no doubt that joining DFK in 1993 has been a significant catalyst in the success and growth of our firm. Since then, we have grown to become a 10 Partner and 115 staff practice and one of the leading independent practices in Ireland.

There is great comfort in being able to connect our clients with trusted friends all around the world when they need help and advice abroad.”

The association provides us with a platform to share knowledge, ideas and best practice as well as information about the latest technology to ensure we remain at the forefront of the sector.

It is also a pioneer in training and development, creating programmes to specifically develop young professionals in the industry as they progress in their careers.

DFK International has 229 member firms which have a combined total of 441 offices across 93 countries.

The association strives for equality, diversity and inclusion, promoting a culture that celebrates difference, challenges prejudice and ensures fairness.

We are proud to have been part of such a magnificent organisation for such a long time and look forward to continuing to be part of the DFK family.

DFK International Conference 2019 in Singapore

Eddie Murphy & James O’Connor DFK International Conference 2019, Singapore

Happy 60th Birthday DFK!

To learn more about DFK International visit www.dfk.com.

Edward Murphy, Head of Tax, was featured in Cork Chamber’s 200th anniversary magazine. He discusses Cork, the local Cork SME sector and it’s success on the domestic and global stage.

You can read the full interview below.

Q:   What’s it like to do business in Ireland’s fastest growing city region?

A:   It’s hard not to be excited by the hive of activity in Cork in recent years – from the myriad of new developments, a growing workforce and a thriving third-level education sector to the region’s continued success in attracting high-value overseas investment. However, it’s the global success of our indigenous Cork SME sector that is, perhaps the most exciting.

Q:   Why have indigenous Cork SMEs been so successful locally and globally?

A:   While Cork has a well-earned reputation in attracting and retaining foreign direct investment, the support it offers homegrown entrepreneurs and SMEs is second to none. Innovation and the ambition to think globally is nurtured through an excellent support ecosystem of start-up incubators, accelerator programmes and research, development and innovation hubs; backed by local business organisations, third-level institutions, and public and private investors.

Q:   What are the key challenges facing SMEs looking to expand overseas?

A:   The continued uncertainty surrounding Brexit is currently the biggest challenge facing SMEs that trade with the UK. However, a constant challenge relevant to all markets is access to local, trusted and reliable professional connections and advice overseas. This is a key step in any global expansion strategy and is often a major stumbling block for many businesses. Understanding how to do business in a new jurisdiction can be time consuming and expensive when you don’t have a local relationship or know where to go to get the proper advice.

Q:   Can you describe how Crowleys DFK can help SMEs with their international growth strategies?

A:   At Crowleys DFK, we understand the challenges faced by our SME and owner-managed business clients. We are proud of the reputation and long-term relationships we have built with them over the years. They represent a diverse range of today’s most innovative and high-performing industries and sectors, including information and communications technology, life sciences, manufacturing and consumer products.

We have been a member of DFK International since 1993. This worldwide association of independent accounting, tax and business advisory firms has over 220 member firms covering 92 countries. We have a long history of working with other DFK Firms. It’s through these strong relationships that we can deliver a complete international service to clients.

Whether it’s getting advice on taking on two employees in Germany, accessing capital markets in London or New York or helping technology companies expand into San Francisco, we connect our clients with trusted professionals throughout the world. In many cases our clients prefer to deal with us and in these instances, we instruct the other DFK firms. This means clients can concentrate on their business and don’t need to spend time developing new relationships abroad.

We have all the right connections to help businesses achieve their ambitions – locally and globally.

Contact us today for expert advice on growing your SME.

Crowleys DFK is delighted to launch an overview video of the Firm’s Foreign Direct Investment service offering.

Edward Murphy, Partner and Head of Foreign Direct Investment and Siobhán O’Hea, Partner, Tax Services provide an insight into how Crowleys DFK can help foreign owned companies to set up operations in Ireland.

For more information on our Foreign Direct Investment service offering, please contact Edward Murphy.

Many companies fail to realise that their Research and Development activities could qualify for valuable tax incentives, explains Edward Murphy, Partner and Head of Tax Services.

Ireland has a well established reputation as a friendly environment for innovative businesses. Government strategy, set out in Innovation 2020, is to nurture excellent research in strategically important areas that benefit the economy and society. A key ambition is to increase investment in research and development and, to this end, Government works with, and funds, various programmes through agencies such as Enterprise Ireland, Science Foundation Ireland, IDA Ireland, InterTrade Ireland and the Higher Education Authority. In addition, research and development tax incentives are available to help develop business and attract high quality jobs. Two of the most important of these incentives are the Research & Development Tax Credit regime and the Knowledge Development Box.

R&D Tax Credit

If your company spends money on research and development activities, you may qualify for a Research and Development (R&D) Tax Credit. This scheme is administered by the Irish Revenue Commissioners and is open to companies who are liable to Irish tax and carrying out qualifying R&D activity in Ireland and/or the European Economic Area (EEA).

The credit is calculated at 25% of qualifying expenditure and is used to reduce your company’s liability to Corporation Tax.

If you have insufficient Corporation Tax against which to claim the R&D tax credit in a given accounting period, the credit may be set against the Corporation Tax for the preceding period. It can also be carried forward indefinitely or, if your company is a member of a group, it can be allocated to other group members.

In some circumstances, the R&D credit can also be claimed as a payable credit.

Qualifying research and development activities must meet certain conditions, such as:

  • involve systemic, investigative or experimental activities
  • be in the field of science or technology
  • involve basic research and/or applied research and/or experimental development
  • seek to make scientific or technological advancement
  • involve the resolution of scientific or technological uncertainty.

To claim the R&D tax credit, it is not necessary to hold the intellectual property rights resulting from the R&D work. It is also not necessary for the R&D work to be successful. The credit is claimed using the Revenue Online Service (ROS). However, before submitting a claim it is important to check that you meet the requirements and have all the necessary supporting documentation. While this may appear onerous, a good tax advisor can guide you through the process. Paying attention to detail when submitting your claim can help avoid Revenue queries and/or a Revenue audit.

Knowledge Development Box

The Knowledge Development Box (KDB) is a tax relief which reduces the Corporation Tax payable on a company’s income from qualifying patents, computer programmes and, for smaller companies, certain other certified intellectual property (IP). Ireland’s KDB was the first IP regime to be fully compliant with new international tax standards and ranks favourably with similar schemes in other countries.

If your company qualifies for the KDB regime, you can avail of a deduction equal to 50 percent of your qualifying profits. In effect, this reduces the normal Corporation Tax rate of 12.5 percent to 6.25 percent on qualifying profits.

For KDB purposes, qualifying assets are those created from R&D activities such as:

  • a computer programme
  • an invention protected by a qualifying patent
  • IP for small companies which is certified by the Controller of Patents as patentable, but not patented.

Marketing related IP such as trademarks, brands, image rights and other intellectual property used to market goods or services are not considered to be qualifying assets.

To apply for the KDB, you must submit your claim on your Corporation Tax return via the Revenue Online Service (ROS). As with R&D tax credits, before submitting a claim it is important to check that you meet the requirements and have all the necessary supporting documentation.

Conclusion

Companies sometimes mistakenly believe that they are not engaged in research and development because they do no operate in industries such as pharma or technology. However, in many instances, companies in other sectors such as manufacturing, energy, financial services, agribusiness, food and drink, are eligible for R&D tax credits and/or the Knowledge Development Box. While navigating the conditions attached to submitting a claim can appear daunting, these are valuable incentives both for indigenous Irish SMEs and for multinationals and are therefore well worth considering.

Talk to us

Edward Murphy
Partner and Head of Tax Services
edward.murphy@crowleysdfk.ie

Ireland enjoys an enviable reputation as a business-friendly location and it’s not just global giants who reap the benefits, says Edward Murphy, Partner and Head of Tax Services.

Ireland is home to many of the world’s most successful companies. Sixteen of the top twenty global technology firms are located here as are twenty-four of the twenty-five top biotech and pharma companies.

However, it is not just global giants that reap the benefits of doing business in Ireland. Many smaller companies also take advantage of the pro-business culture and ease of access to EU markets.

In the software sector alone, more than 900 multinational and indigenous firms employ 24,000 people generating €16 billion of exports annually, according to IDA Ireland, the state agency responsible for promoting foreign direct investment.

Ireland’s Foreign Direct Investment Success

One reason for Ireland’s foreign direct investment (FDI) success is the favourable tax regime. There are double tax treaty agreements in place with 72 other countries and the 12.5 percent corporate tax rate is one of the lowest in the EU.

Other advantages include an attractive holding company regime and tax incentives for certain types of investment. For example, Irish-resident companies carrying out qualifying research and development activity can avail of a ‘Knowledge Development Box’ where eligible profits are taxed at a rate of just 6.25 percent.

Tax not the only reason to locate in Ireland

While tax is undoubtedly an important consideration, it is not the only reason foreign businesses choose to locate in Ireland. Other influences include:

  • Ease of doing business.
  • Supportive state agencies.
  • Political stability.
  • EU membership and proximity to EU markets.
  • Strong legal framework for the development, exploitation and protection of intellectual property rights.
  • English-speaking population (When the UK leaves the EU, Ireland will be the only English-speaking EU member state).
  • Strong talent pipeline with around 30 percent of Irish third level students enrolled in science, technology, engineering and maths (STEM).
  • Collaborative ecosystem where industry and academics work together to the benefit of society and the economy.
  • Growing economy. GDP growth of 4.4 percent is forecast for 2018 and 3.9 percent for
US and Canadian Companies in Ireland

Around 700 US companies are located in Ireland, employing more than 150,000 people.  Anecdotally, US technology companies report that they can hire two engineers in Ireland for the price of one in Silicon Valley, with higher multiples for some engineering specialties.

Notwithstanding the Trump administration’s recent tax reform package which will see US corporation tax rates fall from 35 percent to 20 percent, Ireland’s corporate tax rate is still only around half the US rate when federal taxes are taken into account.

Canadian interest in Ireland is also growing. The EU-Canada trade deal which provisionally came into force in September 2017 will create further opportunities for Canadian businesses seeking to set up in Ireland.

Conclusion

At a time of global economic and political uncertainty, Ireland offers a stable, pro-business environment and is an excellent location from which companies seeking to establish a base in the EU can develop and expand their businesses.

Crowleys DFK assists many foreign owned companies to set up operations in Ireland. For more information and to discuss your specific requirements, please get in touch.

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What Our Clients Say

Edward Murphy
Partner and Head of Tax Services
edward.murphy@crowleysdfk..ie