Edward Murphy, Head of Tax, was featured in Cork Chamber’s 200th anniversary magazine. He discusses Cork, the local Cork SME sector and it’s success on the domestic and global stage.

You can read the full interview below.

Q:   What’s it like to do business in Ireland’s fastest growing city region?

A:   It’s hard not to be excited by the hive of activity in Cork in recent years – from the myriad of new developments, a growing workforce and a thriving third-level education sector to the region’s continued success in attracting high-value overseas investment. However, it’s the global success of our indigenous Cork SME sector that is, perhaps the most exciting.

Q:   Why have indigenous Cork SMEs been so successful locally and globally?

A:   While Cork has a well-earned reputation in attracting and retaining foreign direct investment, the support it offers homegrown entrepreneurs and SMEs is second to none. Innovation and the ambition to think globally is nurtured through an excellent support ecosystem of start-up incubators, accelerator programmes and research, development and innovation hubs; backed by local business organisations, third-level institutions, and public and private investors.

Q:   What are the key challenges facing SMEs looking to expand overseas?

A:   The continued uncertainty surrounding Brexit is currently the biggest challenge facing SMEs that trade with the UK. However, a constant challenge relevant to all markets is access to local, trusted and reliable professional connections and advice overseas. This is a key step in any global expansion strategy and is often a major stumbling block for many businesses. Understanding how to do business in a new jurisdiction can be time consuming and expensive when you don’t have a local relationship or know where to go to get the proper advice.

Q:   Can you describe how Crowleys DFK can help SMEs with their international growth strategies?

A:   At Crowleys DFK, we understand the challenges faced by our SME and owner-managed business clients. We are proud of the reputation and long-term relationships we have built with them over the years. They represent a diverse range of today’s most innovative and high-performing industries and sectors, including information and communications technology, life sciences, manufacturing and consumer products.

We have been a member of DFK International since 1993. This worldwide association of independent accounting, tax and business advisory firms has over 220 member firms covering 92 countries. We have a long history of working with other DFK Firms. It’s through these strong relationships that we can deliver a complete international service to clients.

Whether it’s getting advice on taking on two employees in Germany, accessing capital markets in London or New York or helping technology companies expand into San Francisco, we connect our clients with trusted professionals throughout the world. In many cases our clients prefer to deal with us and in these instances, we instruct the other DFK firms. This means clients can concentrate on their business and don’t need to spend time developing new relationships abroad.

We have all the right connections to help businesses achieve their ambitions – locally and globally.

Contact us today for expert advice on growing your SME.

Choosing an appropriate location for a company’s registered office arises under the Companies Act 2014. It is the duty of each director and secretary of a company to ensure the requirements for a Company’s registered office are complied with.

The location of a Company’s registered office is disclosed publicly on the Companies Registration Office website.

A Company’s registered office address must be an actual physical location within the State. A post office box number is not sufficient.

Company statutory registers must be kept at a Company’s registered office and members of the public can inspect registers at that location. Documents may be delivered by hand to the registered office.

A Company’s registered office address is the address to which all legal notices, including correspondence from the Companies Registration Office and at times the Revenue Commissioners, may be sent.

Any document will be validly served on a company by leaving it at, or sending it by post to the Company’s registered office.

Crowleys DFK corporate compliance team have been providing a professional registered office facility for a number of years through offices located in Cork and Dublin.

For further information on our registered office service, please contact:

 

David Morris
Company Secretarial Consultant
david.morris@crowleysdfk.ie

 

Ireland enjoys an enviable reputation as a business-friendly location and it’s not just global giants who reap the benefits, says Edward Murphy, Partner and Head of Tax Services.

Ireland is home to many of the world’s most successful companies. Sixteen of the top twenty global technology firms are located here as are twenty-four of the twenty-five top biotech and pharma companies.

However, it is not just global giants that reap the benefits of doing business in Ireland. Many smaller companies also take advantage of the pro-business culture and ease of access to EU markets.

In the software sector alone, more than 900 multinational and indigenous firms employ 24,000 people generating €16 billion of exports annually, according to IDA Ireland, the state agency responsible for promoting foreign direct investment.

IRELAND’S FOREIGN DIRECT INVESTMENT SUCCESS

One reason for Ireland’s foreign direct investment (FDI) success is the favourable tax regime. There are double tax treaty agreements in place with 72 other countries and the 12.5 percent corporate tax rate is one of the lowest in the EU.

Other advantages include an attractive holding company regime and tax incentives for certain types of investment. For example, Irish-resident companies carrying out qualifying research and development activity can avail of a ‘Knowledge Development Box’ where eligible profits are taxed at a rate of just 6.25 percent.

TAX NOT THE ONLY REASON TO LOCATE IN IRELAND

While tax is undoubtedly an important consideration, it is not the only reason foreign businesses choose to locate in Ireland. Other influences include:

  • Ease of doing business.
  • Supportive state agencies.
  • Political stability.
  • EU membership and proximity to EU markets.
  • Strong legal framework for the development, exploitation and protection of intellectual property rights.
  • English-speaking population (When the UK leaves the EU, Ireland will be the only English-speaking EU member state).
  • Strong talent pipeline with around 30 percent of Irish third level students enrolled in science, technology, engineering and maths (STEM).
  • Collaborative ecosystem where industry and academics work together to the benefit of society and the economy.
  • Growing economy. GDP growth of 4.4 percent is forecast for 2018 and 3.9 percent for

US AND CANADIAN COMPANIES IN IRELAND

Around 700 US companies are located in Ireland, employing more than 150,000 people.  Anecdotally, US technology companies report that they can hire two engineers in Ireland for the price of one in Silicon Valley, with higher multiples for some engineering specialties.

Notwithstanding the Trump administration’s recent tax reform package which will see US corporation tax rates fall from 35 percent to 20 percent, Ireland’s corporate tax rate is still only around half the US rate when federal taxes are taken into account.

Canadian interest in Ireland is also growing. The EU-Canada trade deal which provisionally came into force in September 2017 will create further opportunities for Canadian businesses seeking to set up in Ireland.

CONCLUSION

At a time of global economic and political uncertainty, Ireland offers a stable, pro-business environment and is an excellent location from which companies seeking to establish a base in the EU can develop and expand their businesses.

Crowleys DFK assists many foreign owned companies to set up operations in Ireland. For more information and to discuss your specific requirements, please get in touch.

TALK TO US

What Our Clients Say

Edward Murphy
Partner and Head of Tax Services
edward.murphy@blacknighthosting.com

The Finance Bill 2017 has introduced a tax efficient share option scheme for employees of SMEs. The Finance Bill provides that from 1 January 2018, SMEs in Ireland will be able to grant KEEP (Key Employee Engagement Programme) share options to their employees.

The change in a tax treatment of these share options means an employee may exercise a “qualifying” share option without incurring the liability to income tax, PRSI and USC that he would have under the current rules. Currently, gains arising on the exercise of a share option at a discount on market value are subject to income tax, PRSI and USC. However, KEEP provides that tax on such shares will be deferred until the shares are disposed of and the employee will pay only capital gains tax at 33% on his profit when the shares are sold.

The KEEP Scheme was introduced to facilitate the use of share-based remuneration to attract and retain key employees in unquoted companies.

A number of conditions must be satisfied in order to avail this tax advantageous KEEP Share Option incentive, which are briefly set out below:

Qualifying share options

  • Shares must be new, ordinary fully paid up with no preferential, current or future rights to dividends or assets on a winding up or redemption
  • Share options must have an exercise price that is not less than the market value of the underlying shares on the date the option is granted
  • There must be a written contract in place setting out number and type of shares, option price and exercise period
  • Share options cannot be exercised within 12 months of grant other than in limited circumstances and options cannot be exercised more than 10 years after date of grant
  • Share options must be granted for bona fide commercial purposes the main purpose of which is to recruit or retain employees in the company and not part of a tax avoidance scheme or arrangement.

Qualifying company

  • For the purpose of the relief the company must be a “qualifying” company i.e. must have been Ireland/EEA incorporated and Irish resident or carrying on a business in Ireland through a branch or agency
  • Qualifying company must be carrying on trading activities with the exception of certain excluded activities set out in legislation. The most notable of these excluded activities include professional service companies, companies dealing in or developing land, financial activities and the building and construction industry
  • The company must be unquoted and remain within the definition of an SME i.e. a company with less than 250 employees and with turnover less than €50m or less than €43m balance sheet
  • The company can only have a maximum of €3m value of share options in issue and unexercised at any one time.

Qualifying individual

  • Must be a fulltime employee/director working at least 30 hours per week
  • The employment held must be capable of being held for at least a further 12 months from the date the option is granted
  • The employee must not acquire or be connected to a person who controls more than 15% of the ordinary share capital of the company during option period
  • Market value of all shares which can be granted in any year of assessment to an employee cannot exceed €100k in any one tax year, €250k in any three consecutive years or 50% of the employee’s annual emoluments for the year in which the option is granted.

KEEP will be available for qualifying share options granted between 1 January 2018 and 31 December 2023. As State Aid approval will be required to introduce this scheme, the scheme is subject to a Ministerial Order.

Contact our Tax Department if you have any questions about KEEP share options or other employee share scheme matters.