The Companies Act 2014 (the “Act”) places requirements on companies and their officers to display information on company stationery and websites. The requirements set out in the Act are summarised below.

Letterhead

The following particulars must be shown on all business letters:

  • the full name of the company
  • the forename (or initials) and surnames and any former forenames and surnames of the directors and their nationality, if not Irish.

In addition to business letter and company order forms, all limited liability companies must disclose the following, in paper or any other form:

  • the legal form of the company
  • the number under which it is registered with the Registrar of Companies
  • address of the registered office
  • if the share capital of a company is mentioned on letterheads or order forms of a company, the reference must be to the issued share capital

Websites

Companies are required to disclose the following information on their homepage or on an accessible webpage:

  • the legal form of the company
  • address of the registered office
  • if the share capital of a company is mentioned on letterheads or order forms of a company, the reference must be to the issued share capital

This publication is intended only as general guidance and should not be used as a substitute for professional advice.

For further information, please contact David Morris, Senior Consultant in our Corporate Compliance Department.

Do you trade with the United Kingdom, or transport goods to/from Europe via the UK? Then you will need to consider the impact of Brexit on your organisation and put in place an action plan to ensure you are best prepared for whatever outcome on the 31st October 2019.

Supply Chain
Review your supply chain. Map the movement of goods into and out of the UK and goods going to and from Europe via the UK, to understand the potential for disruption caused by Brexit (possible delays, clearance requirements, additional checks on goods etc.) Consider actions you can take to prevent this disruption.

Customs Clearance
If you intend to import/export goods to and from the UK, you will need to be registered with Customs. Customs declarations will be required in order to move the goods through the border.

  • Ensure you have an Irish Customs registration number- ‘EORI number’ beginning with IE
  • You will also need a UK EORI number beginning with GB
  • Engage with a customs clearance agent/broker to lodge Customs declarations on your behalf.

Customs Duty
Customs Duty will apply to the import of many goods from the UK into Ireland and vice versa. It is non recoverable and is an additional cost to the business.

  • Ensure you correctly assign the correct commodity codes to the goods imported/exported. The codes will be needed in customs declarations and will determine the amount of duty to be paid.
  • Consult with your agent/broker to see if any reliefs are available.
  • Establish whether you need to obtain a ‘Deferred Payment Account’, this will allow you to import goods into Ireland from the UK and defer the payment of Customs Duties and Import VAT to the month following import.

Vat on Importation
The Irish Revenue passed a bill allowing for the “Postponed Accounting” for VAT on importation where businesses would no longer pay VAT at importation. You can instead account for VAT through the normal monthly VAT return resulting in a significant cash flow saving.  However, they will introduce qualifying criteria for this provision over time. If you do not qualify, VAT (currently 23% for ROI) will apply to the import of many goods from the UK into Ireland and will be payable at the time of import of the goods into Ireland.

Product Certification
The area of product certification will change post-Brexit. UK notified bodies will lose their status as EU notified bodies and will not have any legal status in the EU. This means they cannot provide EU certification. If you rely on UK notified body, you must source an alternative notified body in the EU.

  • More detailed information is available at www.nsai.ie/brexit

Exchange Rates
Currency/exchange rate exposures are a risk for businesses trading in foreign currency. You can take steps to help reduce your exposure.

  • Consider Dual Invoicing
  • Currency Hedging/Forward contracts

ERP Systems
Companies should assess the changes required to be made to their ERP/Finance systems and the time/cost that it will take to implement these changes.

For further assistance, please contact Edward Murphy | Partner | Head of Tax services.

For further information you can visit the below websites or call your local enterprise office.

www.gov.ie/brexit

www.revenue.ie/brexit

www.localenterprise.ie/brexit

www.prepareforbrexit.com

Voluntary Strike-Off is one way in which you may formally wind up a company.

An Irish company that ceases to trade or never traded and has no outstanding creditors can request the Registrar of Companies to strike-off a company from the Register of Companies. Section 733 of the Companies Act 2014 gives the Registrar power to strike companies off the register.

A summary of the requirements is outlined below:

To proceed with a Voluntary Strike-Off application, the director(s) of a company need to ensure that the assets of the company are not greater than €150. Liabilities must also not be greater than €150. Also, all tax filings must be up to date with Revenue.

There are two statutory forms that must be completed and submitted to the Companies Registration Office, the G1-H15 and the H15. The form H15 must be signed by all the directors confirming that the company has ceased to carry on business and that there are no assets or liabilities more than the above-mentioned thresholds remaining. The Form G1-H15 must be signed by a director or secretary of the company.

A Letter of No Objection from Revenue and an advertisement from a daily newspaper must accompany the statutory forms when being submitted to the Companies Registration Office. Once the application is registered by the Companies Registration Office, the company will become ‘Strike-Off Listed’. Approximately 3 months thereafter becoming Strike-Off Listed the company will be dissolved.

For further assistance with the Voluntary Strike-Off process, please contact David Morris, Senior Consultant in our Corporate Compliance Department.

Budget 2019 increased the Home Carer Tax Credit from €1,200 to €1,500 per annum. This tax credit is available to married couples or registered civil partners, where one spouse stays at home to care for a “dependant”.

A dependant can be:
  • a child for whom child benefit is payable;
  • a person aged 65 years or over; or
  • an incapacitated individual.

It does not include a spouse or partner. Often there may be one or more dependants being cared for by the carer spouse. This does not increase the tax credit available.

The Home Carer Tax Credit is often unclaimed as there is a misconception that you must be caring for a sick relative. This is not the case.

Conditions to qualify:
  • You must be jointly assessed for income tax.
  • The dependant person must normally reside with the carer for the tax year. However, if the dependant person is a relative, they can live next door, on the same property or within 2kms of the carer. A relative includes a relative by marriage or a person for whom the claimant is a legal guardian, but not a spouse or civil partner. However, there must be a direct communication link between the two residences such as a telephone or alarm system.
  • The carer spouse must have income of €7,200 per annum or less (excluding any carers benefit or payments received from the Department of Social Protection). If you earn more than €7,200 but less than €10,200 per annum, you may claim a reduced credit:

For example, if the carer spouse earns €8,200 per annum, the maximum tax credit that can be claimed is reduced by the additional earnings as follows €8,200-€7,200=€1,000/2 = €500. The tax credit is reduced by €500 giving a maximum credit of €1,000 available.

If the carer spouse earns €10,200 or above, no Home Carer Tax Credit is available.

This tax credit cannot be claimed alongside the increased standard rate bands for married couples/civil partners. Revenue will grant you the more beneficial option.

Remember; if you qualified for the Home Carer Tax Credit in any of the past 4 tax years (2018, 2017, 2016, and 2015), you can still make a claim to Revenue for it.

If you require any assistance with the home carer tax credit, please contact Michelle Mangan, Manager of Tax Services.

27 August 2019 – Crowleys DFK, one of Ireland’s leading accounting, tax and advisory firms, is delighted to announce the appointment of David Coombes as a Partner in its Public Sector Services Department.

New Partner Promtion: David Coombes, Partner, Public Sector Services

Pictured: (l-r) James O’Connor, Managing Partner and David Coombes, Partner, Public Sector Services

David joins the partner group having previously held the position of Director within the Public Sector Services team. David joined the firm in 2006 and is highly experienced leading public sector financial and business advisory assignments in areas such as financial reporting framework implementation, management information system design, strategic finance support, risk management and governance compliance.

Commenting on the appointment, Managing Partner, James O’Connor said, “David’s appointment, along with our other senior promotions announcement last month, reflects the firm’s continued strong growth and our commitment to the long-term career development of our staff. I am delighted to see so many of our people moving ahead in their careers.

I would like to congratulate David on this important career milestone. His appointment is a thoroughly deserved recognition of the outstanding contribution he has made to the growth of the practice over the years and for his hard work and commitment to the firm and to our clients.”

New Partner Promotion: David Coombes and Vincent Teo

Pictured: (l-r) Vincent Teo, Partner and Head of Public Sector Services and David Coombes, Partner, Public Sector Services

According to Vincent Teo, Partner and Head of the Public Sector Services Department, “Crowleys DFK remains one of only a handful of accountancy firms in Ireland with a dedicated Public Sector Department. As the Department reports rapid year on year growth, it is important for us to have strong leadership to carry on this momentum, and to ensure that we deliver a seamless and consistent service to our public sector clients as they navigate the substantial financial reporting, governance and internal control compliance that is placed upon them.

David’s appointment will provide a great boost to the leadership team. He is consistently well regarded by clients and is a great addition to our partner group.”

Commenting on his promotion to Partner, David Coombes said: “I’m delighted to have been given this opportunity and feel very fortunate to be part of a firm which offers the best career development opportunities possible for its staff. I see an exciting future ahead for both the firm and the Public Sector Services Department. I look forward to working closely with the Partners and our talented team to continue to grow the firm and broaden our services to our clients.”

The Companies Act 2014 for the first time has set out the principal fiduciary duties of a company director. Fiduciary duties are in addition to other statutory duties under the Companies Act 2014 and other legislation. The principal fiduciary duties of a company director are owed to the company, and the company alone.

The principal fiduciary duties of a company director are to:

  • Act in good faith in what the director considers to be the interest of the company.
  • Act honestly and responsibly in relation to the conduct of the affairs of the company.
  • Act in accordance with the company’s constitution and exercise his or her powers only for the purposes allowed by law.
  • Not benefit from or use the company’s property, information or opportunities for his or her own or anyone else’s benefit unless the company’s constitution permits it or a resolution is passed in a general meeting.
  • Not agree to restrict the director’s power to exercise an independent judgment unless this is expressly permitted by the company’s constitution.
  • Avoid any conflict between the director’s duties to the company and the director’s other interests unless the director is released from his or her duty to the company in relation to the matter concerned.
  • Exercise the care, skill and diligence which would be reasonably expected of a person in the same position with similar knowledge and experience as a director. A director may be held liable for any loss resulting from their negligent behaviour.

For further information on the impact of fiduciary duties on your company’s board of directors please contact David Morris, Senior Consultant in our Corporate Compliance Department.

As colleges start back in the coming weeks and the costs of third level fees become apparent, tax-payers will be happy to know that relief is available.

Tax-payers who pay third level fees on their own behalf or on behalf of another person can claim tax relief.

Tax relief is available at the standard rate of 20% (subject to certain restrictions) on tuition fees including the student contribution (sometimes called a registration fee) paid for full- or part-time third level courses. For the academic year 2019-2020, the student contribution is capped at €3,000.

The tax relief claim must be made in respect of an approved course(s) in an approved college(s).

There is no limit on the number of students per claim, provided that the tax payer has paid the fees.

The first €3,000 is disregarded in the case of a Full-Time student or € 1,500 in the case of a Part Time student. If you have paid fees for more than one student, this disregard amount will only be deducted from your claim once.

The allowable claim is limited to a maximum of €7,000 per student per course.

Fees funded by grants, scholarships or by an employer will not qualify for relief.

Example

The table below is based on a family with two students in third level education. Student 1 is an existing student entering year 3 of their studies and student 2 is commencing third level education for the first time in 2019.

Student 1 (Full time) Started third level in 2017/2018 Student 2 (Full time)
Started third level in 2019/2020
Total Claim
Student Contribution
(Registration Fee)
€3,000 €3,000 €6,000
Disregard Amount (One per claim) (€3,000)
Allowable Cost €3,000
Tax Relief @ 20% €600

Should you require any further information or assistance in claiming the tax relief, please contact Michelle Mangan, Manager of Tax Services.

The Help to Buy (HTB) incentive is a scheme to help first time property buyers. It helps with the deposit needed to buy or build a new house or apartment. In order to claim the HTB scheme, you must:

  • Be a first-time buyer
  • Take out a mortgage that is at least 70% of the purchase value of the property
  • Be tax compliant
  • Live in the property for a minimum of 5 years after purchase

To qualify, you must have not bought or built a house or apartment previously on your own or jointly with any other person. You will still qualify for HTB if you have previously inherited or have been gifted a property.

The HTB scheme is back dated to include homes bought from 19 July 2016 and will be available to 31 December 2019. If the property was purchased between 19 July 2016 and 31 December 2016, the price of the property must be €600,000 or less. If the property is bought between 1 January 2017 and 31 December 2019, the property must cost €500,000 or less.

The amount you can claim is the lessor of the following:

  • €20,000
  • 5% of the purchase price of the new home.
  • The amount of Income Tax and Deposit Interest Retention Tax (DIRT) you have paid in the previous 4 tax years.

Regardless of the amount of people who enter into the contract to buy or build the property, the cap of €20,000 applies. Universal Service Charge (USC) and Pay related Social Insurance (PRSI) are not considered when calculating the amount you are entitled to claim.

If you purchased or built the property between 19 July 2016 and 31 December 2016, the refund will be issued directly to you. If you buy a new build between 1 January 2017 and 31 December 2019, the refund will be issued to your contractor. The contractor must be approved by Revenue. If you self-build, the refund is paid to a bank account held with your mortgage provider.

Revenue may clawback the refund if:

  • You do not live in the property for 5 years
  • You do not complete the process to buy the house
  • You were not entitled to the refund
  • The property is not completed

Once the property is built or bought, you have the sole responsibility of complying with the conditions for the HTB refund.

If you require any assistance with HTB or  further details on the above, please contact us.

Revenue has recently clarified the taxation of couriers, specifically the tax treatment of motor cycle and bicycle couriers. The following treatment applies from 1 January 2019. Previous agreements will come to an end on this date.

Motor cycle and bicycle couriers are generally engaged under a contract for service i.e. they are self-employed individuals. Whilst the facts of each case may differ, this is the general view adopted by Revenue.

From 1 January 2019 motor cycle and bicycle couriers engaged under a contract for service i.e. self-employed individuals, will need to file a tax return self-assessment.

Expenses

Self-employed couriers can make a claim for any expenditure incurred wholly and exclusively for the purpose of their courier activity, for example, motor expenses & telephone/internet bills.

Revenue’s previous agreement of flat rate deductions for expenses (20%,40% or 45%) will no longer apply with effect from 1 January 2019.

Voluntary PAYE

Voluntary PAYE systems of tax have been implemented by several courier firms to assist couriers in ensuring that they are tax compliant. Revenue has no issue with these arrangements continuing, however Revenue has reiterated that income tax, USC & PRSI should be applied on gross income.

Van Owner-Driver Couriers

Similar to motor cycle and bicycle couriers, Revenue are of the view that van owner-driver couriers are engaged under a contract for service and thus they are self-employed individuals.

Pay and File System for Income Tax Self-Assessment

Under self-assessment there is a common date for the payment of tax and filing of tax returns. You must file your tax return on or before 31 October in the year after the year to which the return relates.

This system, which is known as Pay and File, requires you to:
• file your return for the previous year
• make a self-assessment for that year
• pay the balance of tax for that year
• pay preliminary tax for the current year.

For example, by 31 October 2019 you must:
• pay your preliminary tax for 2019
• file your 2018 self-assessment tax return
• pay any Income Tax (IT) balance for 2018.

When you pay and file through the Revenue Online Service (ROS), the 31 October deadline is extended to mid-November.

For more information on the taxation of couriers, please contact Michelle Mangan, Manager of Tax Services.

Exit tax regimes seek to impose a tax on unrealised capital gains where companies migrate their tax residency or transfer assets offshore.

Prior to Budget 2019, Ireland had a limited exit tax regime that was subject to several exceptions. While it was expected that new exit tax rules would be introduced before 1 January 2020 to comply with the EU’s Anti-Tax Avoidance Directive (ATAD), the implementation of new rules from 10 October 2018 was earlier than anticipated.

Old exit tax regime

Under the old exit tax regime, where a company changed its tax residence so that it was no longer within the scope of Irish tax, it was treated as disposing and reacquiring its assets at market value. This triggered a charge to tax at the rate of 33%, the standard capital gains tax rate.

The exit tax did not apply where the assets continued to be used in the State by a branch or agency of the migrating company or where the company was ultimately controlled by residents of a tax treaty country. The exit tax could also be avoided if the company transferring its residency was a 75% subsidiary of an Irish resident company and certain conditions were met for 10 years after the migration.

New exit tax regime

The new rules tax the unrealised gains of corporate entities where the following events occur:

  • A company transfers assets from its permanent establishment (PE) in Ireland to its head office or to a PE in another territory;
  • A company transfers the business (including the assets of the business) carried on by its PE in Ireland to another territory; or
  • An Irish resident company transfers its residence to another country.

The rate of tax applicable will generally be 12.5%. However, there is an anti-avoidance measure that applies a rate of 33% where the event triggering the tax forms part of a transaction to avail of the 12.5% rate rather than the standard capital gains tax of 33%.

Key points on the operation of the exit tax:

  • The exit tax will not apply to the transfer of assets that will revert to the PE or company within 12 months of the transfer, where the assets are:
    • Related to the financing of securities;
    • Given as security for a debt; or
    • Where the asset transfer takes place to meet prudential capital requirements or for liquidity management.
  • The tax may be paid in 6 annual instalments where the company migrates to an EU or EEA state.
  • Where a company ceases to be resident and an exit tax charge is imposed, the tax may be recovered from an Irish tax resident company within the group or from an Irish tax resident controlling director.

While the exit tax rate has been reduced, the new rules have significantly broader application than the old regime and transactions that previously would not have been subject to an exit tax may now trigger a tax charge.

For more information please contact Eddie Murphy, Partner and Head of Tax Services.