Finance Act 2017 introduced a change to the current 7-year capital gains tax exemption (“CGT”) which allows for investors to sell their property after 4 years instead of the previous minimum 7-year holding period.

The recent amendment means that rather than holding the property for a minimum of 7 years, taxpayers can sell the property between the 4th and 7th anniversary of the acquisition date and qualify for full exemption from CGT. This change only applies to disposals on or after 1 January 2018.

No relief is available if the property is sold during the initial four-year acquisition period.

If the property is held for longer than seven years, relief will only apply to the portion of the gain relating to the first 7 years ownership and the balance is taxable in the normal way.

The relief continues to apply to both residential and commercial property situated in Ireland or a member of the European Economic Area and to property held by individuals and corporates.

Taxpayers must continue to meet the other conditions of the relief to qualify for the CGT exemption.

Example:

Purchase a commercial property on 1 January 2014:

  • Cost €200,000
  • Stamp Duty €4,000

Sell the commercial property on 1 March 2019:

  • Sales Proceeds €350,000

Capital Gains Tax:

  • Capital Gain = €146,000 (€350,000 – €200,000 – €4,000)

Relief:

  • Full CGT relief will apply as the property was disposed of between the 4thand 7th anniversary of the acquisition date. As such, no CGT is payable on the gain of €146,000

For more information on the above tax relief, please contact a member of our Tax Department.

 

 

Ireland enjoys an enviable reputation as a business-friendly location and it’s not just global giants who reap the benefits, says Edward Murphy, Partner and Head of Tax Services.

Ireland is home to many of the world’s most successful companies. Sixteen of the top twenty global technology firms are located here as are twenty-four of the twenty-five top biotech and pharma companies.

However, it is not just global giants that reap the benefits of doing business in Ireland. Many smaller companies also take advantage of the pro-business culture and ease of access to EU markets.

In the software sector alone, more than 900 multinational and indigenous firms employ 24,000 people generating €16 billion of exports annually, according to IDA Ireland, the state agency responsible for promoting foreign direct investment.

IRELAND’S FOREIGN DIRECT INVESTMENT SUCCESS

One reason for Ireland’s foreign direct investment (FDI) success is the favourable tax regime. There are double tax treaty agreements in place with 72 other countries and the 12.5 percent corporate tax rate is one of the lowest in the EU.

Other advantages include an attractive holding company regime and tax incentives for certain types of investment. For example, Irish-resident companies carrying out qualifying research and development activity can avail of a ‘Knowledge Development Box’ where eligible profits are taxed at a rate of just 6.25 percent.

TAX NOT THE ONLY REASON TO LOCATE IN IRELAND

While tax is undoubtedly an important consideration, it is not the only reason foreign businesses choose to locate in Ireland. Other influences include:

  • Ease of doing business.
  • Supportive state agencies.
  • Political stability.
  • EU membership and proximity to EU markets.
  • Strong legal framework for the development, exploitation and protection of intellectual property rights.
  • English-speaking population (When the UK leaves the EU, Ireland will be the only English-speaking EU member state).
  • Strong talent pipeline with around 30 percent of Irish third level students enrolled in science, technology, engineering and maths (STEM).
  • Collaborative ecosystem where industry and academics work together to the benefit of society and the economy.
  • Growing economy. GDP growth of 4.4 percent is forecast for 2018 and 3.9 percent for

US AND CANADIAN COMPANIES IN IRELAND

Around 700 US companies are located in Ireland, employing more than 150,000 people.  Anecdotally, US technology companies report that they can hire two engineers in Ireland for the price of one in Silicon Valley, with higher multiples for some engineering specialties.

Notwithstanding the Trump administration’s recent tax reform package which will see US corporation tax rates fall from 35 percent to 20 percent, Ireland’s corporate tax rate is still only around half the US rate when federal taxes are taken into account.

Canadian interest in Ireland is also growing. The EU-Canada trade deal which provisionally came into force in September 2017 will create further opportunities for Canadian businesses seeking to set up in Ireland.

CONCLUSION

At a time of global economic and political uncertainty, Ireland offers a stable, pro-business environment and is an excellent location from which companies seeking to establish a base in the EU can develop and expand their businesses.

Crowleys DFK assists many foreign owned companies to set up operations in Ireland. For more information and to discuss your specific requirements, please get in touch.

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What Our Clients Say

Edward Murphy
Partner and Head of Tax Services
edward.murphy@blacknighthosting.com

Up to recently, landlords were not entitled to a tax deduction for expenses such as mortgage interest, insurance and repairs incurred before the date a property was first let out.

To encourage owners of vacant residential properties to offer those properties for rent, Finance Act 2017 has introduced a new tax deduction for pre-letting expenses of a revenue nature incurred on a property that has been vacant for a period of 12 months or more.

The pre-letting expenses are now given as a deduction against rental income from that property in the first year it is let out.

Conditions

The property in question must have been vacant for a period of at least 12 months prior to its first letting during the period 25 December 2017 and 31 December 2021.

The expenditure must have been incurred in the 12 months before the property was let out and a cap of €5,000 per vacant property applies.

Claw Back

Where the landlord

  • ceases to let the property as residential premises or
  • sells the property

within 4 years of the first letting, this tax deduction will be clawed back in the year the property ceases to be let by the landlord.

Contact our Tax Department if you have any questions about pre-letting expenses or other rented residential property queries.